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Old 10-10-2009, 08:34 PM
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Default Dr. Dirk Greineder seeks new trial in wife’s slaying

Dr. Dirk Greineder seeks new trial in wife’s slaying

By Associated Press

Wednesday, October 7, 2009 - Added 3d 9h ago
A once-prominent Massachusetts doctor convicted in the 1999 killing of his wife is asking the state’s highest court to grant him a new trial, saying the jury should not have been allowed to hear about his secret sex life.

The Supreme Judicial Court will hear arguments Friday in an appeal by Dr. Dirk Greineder. He was a well-known allergist when he was convicted of beating his wife with a hammer and slashing her throat after she discovered his trysts with prostitutes and his fascination with Internet pornography.

Greineder argues numerous other grounds for a new trial, including a claim that his trial lawyers should have challenged DNA evidence presented by prosecutors.

Greineder claims his wife was killed by an unknown assailant after the couple separated during a walk in a Wellesley park.

http://www.bostonherald.com/news/regional/view/20091007mass_doctor_seeks_new_trial_in_wifes_slayi ng/srvc=home&position=recent
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:48 PM
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Post High court seeks answers in Wellesley doctor murder case


Greineder at his 2001 trial

October 27, 2009 02:07 PM

By Martin Finucane, Globe Staff

The state's highest court has ordered a lower court judge to report on whether there were flaws in the jury selection process at the trial of Dr. Dirk Greineder, the prominent Wellesley allergist who was convicted in 2001 of killing his wife while the two were walking in a park in their affluent suburb.

The Supreme Judicial Court acted Friday after Greineder's attorney raised questions about the voir dire, the process in which jurors are questioned to determine their suitability to serve, that was conducted at the trial. Attorney Jamie Sultan contended in a hearing earlier this month that the voir dire had been closed, violating Greineder's right to a public trial.

The court asked Superior Court Judge Paul Chernoff, who had presided over the case, to make findings on a number of questions, including who was present in the courtroom during the voir dire, whether there was a sign on the door keeping people out, whether court officers kept people out, and whether the defendant or his lawyer asked for, or agreed to, the procedures.

In a case that drew national attention, a jury found Greineder guilty of murdering his wife, Mabel, by beating her with a hammer and slitting her throat at the Wellesley park on Halloween in 1999. Prosecutors had argued that the defendant killed his wife of 32 years to conceal his secret sex life. The jury rejected his claim that his wife had been slain by an unknown killer. Greineder was sentenced to life in prison but has continued to fight his convictions.

The court asked Chernoff to report his findings within 60 days. It said Chernoff could conduct an evidentiary hearing but wasn't required to do so. Chernoff's clerk didn't immediately return a message seeking comment.


http://www.boston.com/news/local/bre...eks_answe.html
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Old 01-13-2010, 05:58 PM
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Arrow Judge to study jury selection in doc’s slay trial

By Associated Press

Wednesday, January 13, 2010 - Updated 2h ago

It was a sensational murder trial that drew national attention: a prominent doctor from Wellesley charged with bludgeoning his wife with a hammer and slitting her throat after she discovered his secret life of prostitutes and Internet porn.

Nearly a decade later, Dirk Greineder is asking for a new trial based in part on a claim that his constitutional right to a public trial was violated because the public was kept out of the courtroom while jurors were being chosen.

Greineder’s lawyers have some new support for their argument following a ruling last week from the state’s highest court overturning the corruption conviction of a Stoughton police officer because some of his friends and relatives were excluded from a portion of jury selection.

The Supreme Judicial Court found that Officer David Cohen’s Sixth Amendment right to a public trial was violated after some people were turned away by court officers or left after seeing a sign on the door that said, "Jury empanelment. Do not enter."

In the Greineder case, his lawyers are arguing that the public was shut out of jury selection entirely, not just some of the time, as in Cohen’s case.

"The law on this is very powerful — the right of a public trial — and in this case there was nothing on the record to justify (closing the courtroom), it’s just something that apparently was done in the courthouse," said James Sultan, Greineder’s appellate lawyer.

Greineder appealed his conviction on several grounds, but the SJC said it did not have enough information on the jury selection issue.

The high court sent the case back to Judge Paul Chernoff to issue findings on whether there was a sign on the door instructing people to keep out, whether court officers told people to stay out and whether Greineder or his lawyers asked for a closed courtroom. Chernoff will hold a hearing on the issue Thursday.

David Traub, a spokesman for Norfolk District Attorney William Keating, said prosecutors are still reviewing the Cohen decision and would not comment on its potential impact on the Greineder case.

Sultan said he plans to call an assortment of witnesses at Thursday’s hearing — including Greineder — to testify about their memories of jury selection during the 2001 trial. Greineder’s adult children, who attended the trial, and two reporters who covered the trial have also been called to testify, as well as court officers and courthouse clerks.

In the Cohen case, the SJC noted that a court officer testified that it was the policy at Norfolk Superior Court — where both the Cohen and Greineder trials were held — to close the courtroom to the public, except for the media, during jury selection if there is no room for spectators. When there is room, spectators are placed in seating areas on the sides of the courtroom to make sure that the public is not seated near potential jurors.

The SJC recognized that some courtrooms are too small to hold both a large pool of potential jurors and the public. But the court said judges must ensure that members of the public who want to observe jury selection are not barred from doing so.

Michael Cassidy, a professor at Boston College Law School, said having courtrooms open during jury selection is important.

"The reason we have public trials is to instill the trial system with a sense of public legitimacy. The public has a right to participate," Cassidy said.

Greineder was a well-known allergist at Brigham & Women’s Hospital when he was convicted of beating his wife, Mabel, on Oct. 31, 1999, during the couple’s regular walk in a Wellesley park.

Greineder claimed his wife was killed by an unknown assailant after the couple separated during their walk.

http://news.bostonherald.com/news/regional/view/20100113mass_doc_to_testify_as_he_seeks_new_murder _trial/
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Old 01-14-2010, 06:11 PM
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Arrow Mass. doctor testifies in murder appeal

By DENISE LAVOIE
The Associated Press
Thursday, January 14, 2010; 5:01 PM

DEDHAM, Mass. -- A once-prominent Boston doctor convicted of killing his wife after she discovered his secret sex life of prostitutes and Internet pornography has testified that he felt "lonely" and "isolated" when he looked around the courtroom during jury selection at his trial and saw no one there to support him.

The testimony of Dirk Greineder (GREN'-uh-deer) came Thursday during an unusual hearing in his appeal of his 2001 murder conviction.

Greineder's lawyers contend that his constitutional right to a public trial was violated when jury selection was closed.

Greineder said he did not discover he had the right to open jury selection until 2008 while doing research in a prison library.

Greineder's three adult children say they were told they would not be allowed to attend jury selection.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...011403604.html
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