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Old 08-03-2007, 01:12 AM
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Outspoken newsman shot dead in Oakland

Oakland Post editor Chauncey Bailey was a tireless advocate for black community


Christopher Heredia, Leslie Fulbright, Matthai Chakko Kuruvila and Marisa Lagos, Chronicle Staff Writers

Friday, August 3, 2007

Chauncey Bailey, editor of the Oakland Post and a former reporter for the Oakland Tribune, was slain by a masked gunman on a downtown Oakland street Thursday, police said.

Bailey, 57, was shot shortly before 7:30 a.m. on 14th Street near Alice Street while walking to work, police said. Paramedics were unable to revive Bailey, an outspoken advocate for the black community and an unabashed critic of corruption.

"With these types of things, we look at all possible motives -- financial, family, work-related," said Assistant Police Chief Howard Jordan. "We believe he was targeted."

Police spokesman Officer Roland Holmgren described the crime as "madness."

Witnesses told police a lone, masked gunman dressed in dark clothing approached Bailey, shot him once in the back and once in the head and ran away. One news account said the assailant got into a van that drove away, but Jordan said police have not been able to confirm that a van was used or that anyone else participated in the killing.

The spot where Bailey was killed is across the street from a preschool, across a parking lot from a post office and around the corner from a community arts center. No one at Starlight Child Development Center saw anything, although a couple of teachers heard gunshots, said the school's director, John Wong.

Bailey, who lived in Oakland and has a teenage son, was known for his assertive style of questioning city officials, Holmgren said.

"He was very controversial," said Derrick Nesbitt, who worked with Bailey on a cable access channel called "Soul Beat" from 1997 to 2004. "He was tenacious and would not let people off the hook, whether he was reporting on corruption in city government, the entertainment business or among rappers. He ruffled a lot of feathers because of it."

Most of his spats were intellectual, Nesbitt said.

He said he asked Bailey several years ago if he had ever feared for his safety because of his probing into corruption or gang violence. Bailey said he had received threats but had shrugged them off.

Bailey was fired from the Tribune in 2005 for ethics violations, according to several former colleagues. He went on to work for the Post as a freelance foreign correspondent, covering stories in Vietnam and Haiti, and was named editor of the publication in June.

Bailey had recently written stories about foreclosure rates disproportionately affecting African Americans and Latinos. Joseph Debro, a biochemical engineer who also wrote stories for the Post, said Bailey had also been working on a story about a bankruptcy filing by Your Black Muslim Bakery, a series of stores on San Pablo Avenue.

"We're grief-stricken," said Post Publisher Paul Cobb. "We've lost a family member."

"Why is the missing link," said Gene Hazzard, a photographer and contributing writer at the Post.

Relatives were at a similar loss.

"Whatever happened is too much for us," said the mother of Bailey's 13-year-old son, who asked not to be identified out of concern for her son's safety. "We're in shock. Chauncey was involved in big things in Oakland, but ... he kept both his lives separate. What he was to us was a dad."

The Post, a weekly with a circulation of 49,500, is geared toward the African American community and is distributed in Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond and San Francisco.

Gwendolyn Carter, the paper's advertising manager, said news of Bailey's killing reached the office a little before 9 a.m. She said the staff of about 10 people was in shock.

"He was a good man," Carter said. "He always took care of me. He would say I was his little sister and he was my big brother."

Members of the Post staff, including Cobb, as well as local NAACP representatives gathered at the scene of Thursday's shooting, expressing disbelief at Bailey's death and consoling one another.

"I'm shocked, as all of us are in the city. This is a daylight shooting; it's frightening," said Chris Jackson, executive director of the NAACP's Oakland chapter.

John Bowens, the paper's director of advertising, said he and others had no idea what the motive could be.

"He talked to me about what he could do to make Oakland better for people, about how the city could improve," Bowens said. "He spoke his mind."

Mayor Ron Dellums said in a prepared statement, "Chauncey will be missed. He was at every media event, and he always asked the first question. His questions were thoughtful, and you knew that he sought to truly inform the public."

City Councilman Larry Reid called Bailey's killing "a loss to the entire African American community."

"Chauncey is someone who was very well respected, even though he and I sometimes disagreed," Reid said. "It's just really sad. Somehow we as a city, we as human beings have to get a handle on all these guns on the streets and these crazy people who have no sense of the value of a human life."

In a statement, Tribune Managing Editor Martin Reynolds called Bailey "a friend, a valued colleague and a loving father."

"His death has left all of us at the Oakland Tribune shocked and deeply saddened," Reynolds said. "Chauncey's coverage of Oakland's African American community was a tremendous asset to the Tribune. ... We will miss Chauncey and send our sincerest condolences to his friends and family. We now look to the authorities to bring his killer to justice."

Police ask that anyone with information about the killing call investigators at (510) 238-3821. Crime Stoppers is offering a $10,000 reward for information leading to the apprehension of a suspect.

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Old 08-03-2007, 01:25 AM
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Update: Oakland Post editor slain in ambush

Former Tribune reporter shot today in downtown Oakland

By Harry Harris and Angela Hill, Staff Writers
Article Last Updated: 08/02/2007



Chauncey Bailey receives an award as one of the 101-Plus Outstanding Men Making a Difference in Our Community at the Black Expo 2007 in Oakland in July. With him are (left) C. Diane Howell, producer of the Black Expo, and Cheryl Evans, senior vice president, Citibank. (Photo contributed from Black Business Listings)


OAKLAND -
In what police called a targeted killing, longtime Bay Area journalist Chauncey Bailey was ambushed and fatally shot Thursday morning at 14th and Alice streets in downtown as he walked to the Oakland Post, where he recently had been named editor.

Investigators so far have only a vague description of the gunman and no motive in the shooting.

``We have not ruled out anything, including whether it was work-related or a personal dispute,'' said Oakland homicide Sgt. Derwin Longmire. ``But this was no random act. He was the target of a deliberate murder.''

At about 7:25 a.m., Bailey, 57, a former Oakland Tribune reporter, was walking to work from an apartment where he had recently been living near Lake Merritt when a masked gunman dressed in black approached him on foot and fired at least three rounds _ possibly from a shotgun _ hitting Bailey at least once in the upper body, police said.

The attack happened so suddenly and without warning that Bailey was unable to try to flee or defend himself, police said.

``He was just confronted and shot,'' Longmire said.

The gunman then took off on foot to a waiting van and drove away, police said.

The killer apparently knew Bailey's daily routine and route to work, and was not hesitant to shoot him in broad daylight, police said. Bailey was known to stop for breakfast at a fast-food restaurant about a half-block from the shooting, but police were unsure if he had stopped there Thursday. He was carrying some newspapers when he was shot.

Dressed in business attire, wounded Bailey fell to the sidewalk in the 200 block of 14th Street at the edge of a public parking lot near the U.S. Post Office, directly across from the Starlite Child Development Center. Police and paramedics arrived and tried to revive him to no avail. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Friends and co-workers from the Oakland Post converged on the scene when they heard the news, and were at a loss to explain the brazen attack. Post publisher Paul Cobb said he and Bailey were supposed to meet Thursday morning to discuss the launch of a new insert for the paper _ news from the faith-based community about people solving problems, to be called, ``The Good News Is.''

``We were both walking to work from different directions,'' Cobb said. ``I heard the police cars, but of course I had no idea. Then I got to work and the phone rang and it was the police. I nearly dropped the phone.

``I'm not doing well at all,'' he said. ``It's like losing a brother.''

Searching for a motive, investigators interviewed Cobb, asking about any sensitive stories Bailey may have been working on, or any threats he might have received.

``The officers told me not to go into any specifics until they investigate,'' Cobb said. ``But I can say that Chauncey and I have both received many threats over time.''

Cobb said Bailey was in a very good place in life. He was about to be married in the fall, had recently reconnected with his father and was thrilled with his position as Post editor.

``Chauncey and I both had worked all of lives for this opportunity at the paper,'' Cobb said. ``We were talking about that just last night, when he left the office. He was all dressed up really sharp. and I was kidding with him that, `Now you've become editor, you're really dressing the part.'

``He said to me, `You know, I've never had this kind of adulation before.' People would walk up to him on the streets and say, `You're the editor.' He was so pleased to be viewed as the person in charge. It was a real life-affirming journalistic experience for him.''

Cobb admitted Bailey could be prickly. Sometimes brusque, he said. But he never knew a harder working journalist.

``And he was so excited,'' Cobb said. ``He had just gone to Texas to reunite with his father after 25 years, and he was just delighted about it. He had just talked to his father on the phone last night, telling him of some of his plans.''

The Post is planning at least one special memorial edition. Funeral services are pending.

A temporary shrine in Bailey's honor, consisting of a large stuffed teddy bear, a short biography and poster boards for people to write personal messages was in place at the shooting site by late afternoon.

Bailey grew up in Oakland and had lived in East Oakland for many years until he recently moved to an apartment near Lake Merritt. He has a teenage son who spends much of his time with his mother in Southern California, friends said.

Bailey was an Oakland Tribune reporter for 12 years from April 1993 to June 2005, when he was released from the Tribune for conflict-of-interest issues. Just this summer, he was named editor of the Oakland Post, which is geared toward the African-American community, after writing freelance travel stories for the Post for about two years. Over the years, he had worked at other area media outlets including KDIA radio and SoulBeat TV, and was involved with OUR-TV on Comcast Channel 78.

``I can't believe this is Chauncey,'' said local filmmaker and community activist Dedoceo Habi, who lives and works in the downtown area and came down to the site of the shooting.

``I worked with him on a couple of projects in the community, working to create opportunities for youth to get them off the streets,'' he said. ``I know there was some controversy in his past, but he was working hard to do something good. We were just discussing some articles to stimulate positive inspiration in the community.'' ``He wrote about politics. He was a good writer. I don't know if he made somebody mad or something,'' said tearful Gwendolyn Carter, who works in advertising at the Post and had known Bailey for about a year in the weekly newspaper's small 10-person office, located at 14th and Franklin streets. ``He was just promoted as the editor. He was so nice to me. I don't understand this.''

Chris Jackson, head of the Oakland chapter of the NAACP, was also at the crime scene.

``Chauncey usually stops at that McDonald's,'' Jackson said, pointing to the restaurant a block away on 14th and Jackson. ``Then he walks to work from there. It's his morning routine. Someone must have known that.''

Mayor Ron Dellums expressed sadness at Bailey's death, and declared it ``a huge loss for all of Oakland.''

``Chauncey will be missed,'' Dellums said in a prepared statement Thursday. ``He was at every media event and he always asked the first question. His questions were thoughtful and you knew that he sought to truly inform the public.

``It is a tragedy when any person loses his or her life by an act of violence,'' Dellums continued. ``The crime and violence on Oakland streets presents me with the most painful and difficult challenge I've ever faced ... We are all diminished by the loss of any one of us.''

Tribune Managing Editor Martin Reynolds talked with Bailey last week, when they saw each other at Frank H. Ogawa Plaza outside Oakland City Hall. ``He was in his trademark business suit and tie,'' Reynolds said. ``We chatted as we always did when we saw each other, and I congratulated him again on being named editor of the Post.

``Chauncey Bailey was a friend, a valued colleague and a loving father,'' Reynolds added. ``His death has left all of us at the Oakland Tribune shocked and deeply saddened. Chauncey's coverage of Oakland's African-American community was a tremendous asset to the Tribune. We will miss him and send our sincerest condolences to his friends and family.''

Reynolds said Bailey loved his son tremendously, and would often bring him into the Tribune news room. Reynolds said Bailey talked about returning to Vietnam, where he had done several travel stories.

Bailey had experienced some domestic problems in years past. In the spring of 2003, he asked for a restraining order against a girlfriend, alleging she was harassing him at home and at work with endless phone calls and surprise visits to his home.

Although Bailey received a temporary restraining order against the woman, a permanent order was not issued because neither Bailey nor the woman appeared in court for the hearing. Bailey also filed a restraining order in 1994. However, details of that order such as who it was filed against, were not available.

Derrick Nesbitt was a longtime friend, working with Bailey since 1997 on the now-defunct local cable channel called SoulBeat TV. Nesbitt said Bailey was ``a great reporter. He lived for it.

``But he was very controversial,'' Nesbitt said. ``You'd either like him or you didn't. He wasn't trying to be friends with anybody. He could bring anger out in people by the questions he would ask, and by not backing down. I always admired that in him.

``At SoulBeat, he would do news hours and community talk. People would call in to disagree with him right on the air,'' Nesbitt said. ``I don't know what happened here this morning, but he was a good guy. He gave a lot of journalists, interns, opportunities to go on the air at SoulBeat.''

Nesbitt said he felt there was a change in Bailey after he lost his job at the Tribune.

``I always thought he was trying to get back on his track after that.''

``I have no idea why anyone would do this. Chauncey Bailey was a consummate professional,'' said David Glover, executive director of OCCUR, the Oakland Citizens Committee for Urban Renewal, whose friendship with Bailey dates back to the 1980s when Bailey worked in Oakland as a mentor to young people.

Glover recalled Bailey as a good friend and a tireless advocate for journalism _ especially the need to attract more blacks and people of color to the field.

``This is not just a local loss, this is a loss to the field nationally,'' Glover said.

Bailey had also created a Black Press Weekly, a compilation of significant articles from black newspapers around the country, Glover said.

Oakland City Councilmember Larry Reid (Elmhurst-East Oakland) knew Bailey for 10 years and said he was considering accompanying him on a trip to Vietnam later this month.

``Chauncey was somebody who cared about the African-American community, getting news that he felt was not being reported in the major news-media outlets,'' Reid said. ``And he did an incredible job at that.''

Reid's thoughts were with Bailey's son. ``This is another young African American kid who will grow up with only memories of his father,'' he said.

The killing was Oakland's 72nd homicide of the year. Police and Crime Stoppers of Oakland are offering up to $10,000 in reward money for information leading to the arrest of the suspect. Anyone with information can call police at 238-3821 or Crime Stoppers at 238-6946.

Staff writers Paul Rosynsky, Kelly Rayburn and Matthew Cooper contributed to this report.

www.insidebayarea.com/oak...ci_6526194
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Old 08-03-2007, 06:49 PM
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BREAKING NEWS: Black Muslim bakery linked to Bailey ambush killing

By Harry Harris, Angela Hill and Kristin Bender, Staff Writers
Article Last Updated: 08/03/2007 03:49:02 PM PDT


Evidence recovered during the police raid at Your Black Muslim Bakery Friday morning links members of the organization to the ambush killing of Oakland Post Editor Chauncey Bailey, authorities said.
Officials would not say what the evidence is, but sources told the Oakland Tribune that it was a shotgun seized at the bakery that was used to kill Bailey, 57, Thursday morning in downtown Oakland.

Bailey, a former Oakland Tribune reporter, was walking to the Oakland Post when he was gunned down at 14th and Alice streets. Bailey was known to be working on a story about Your Black Muslim Bakery.

During a raid of Your Black Muslim Bakery in North Oakland early Friday, where weapons were confiscated and 19 people detained, authorities also uncovered conditions so unsanitary that the Alameda County Health Department has closed down the popular bakery and cafe.

More than 200 heavily armed police raided the San Pablo Avenue bakery before dawn Friday, recovering several guns and spent ammunition possibly linked to killings, shootings, robberies and a kidnapping, authorities said. Nearly 20 people, including organization leader Yusef Bey IV, were detained in the raid, that also included homes near the bakery in the 5800 block of San Pablo Avenue.

Police also found filth and waste -- including dead rats on the roof and rat droppings in the bakery -- that they believe was leaking into drainage lines, prompting them to call in Vector Control, the city's code compliance unit, State Fish and Game and the Alameda County's District Attorney's environmental crimes unit. Fines for such violations can be up to $5,000 a day.

Police broke down doors and used stun grenades to disorient people to gain entry. No one was hurt in the raids, which began at 5 a.m.

Police also raided homes on Herzog, 60th and Aileen streets, but it was not clear what was found there.


Police said they had probable cause arrest warrants for several men with ties to the Black Muslim Bakery organization but were still trying to determine if they were among those detained. Police said some of those detained had arrest warrants from other police agencies and parolee violations.

Police would not give specific details about the cases they believe are linked to the people associated with the bakery, but did say some were committed last year and earlier this year.

Two are believed to be shooting deaths of two men last month within a few blocks of the bakery, in pre-dawn hours. One was the July 12 shooting death of Michael J. Wills Jr., 36, who had addresses in both Oakland and Fremont. He was gunned down in the 6200 block of San Pablo Avenue.

Four days earlier, Odell Roberson Jr., 31, was shot to death in the 1000 block of 60th Street. Police suspected the murders were connected because of the circumstances and similarities of weapons used.

At least one case possibly linked to the bakery involves the kidnapping several weeks ago of some women whom a ransom was demanded for before they were able to escape, sources said.

And one of the shootings possibly resulted from a love triangle, sources said. The search and probable cause warrants served Friday were signed by a judge several days ago, authorities said.

Asst. Chief Howard Jordan said the warrants were obtained so that police could seek evidence needed ``to further our investigations into these different crimes.''

He said the men named in the probable cause warrants ``are very violent individuals who need to be in custody.'' More than 200 law enforcement officers, mainly from Oakland with assistance from the Alameda County Sheriff's Office, Fremont, Hayward, Livermore and Alameda police took part in the raids.

Jordan said none of the suspected crimes involving the organization happened in those other jurisdictions but their assistance was needed because Oakland police entry teams train with them.

A news conference is planned later today.

Your Black Muslim Bakery and its affiliated businesses, which fill several storefronts along both sides of San Pablo Avenue near the Emeryville and Berkeley borders, have long been alternately praised and vilified. Police said the Nation of Islam, an umbrella organization for Muslims nationwide, is not affiliated with the bakery. ``We do not have any reason to believe that the Nation of Islam is involved in any of this activity,'' said Assistant Chief Howard Jordan.

The late Black Muslim patriarch Yusuf Bey founded the bakery in 1968, building his organization on ideals of black empowerment, respect and self-reliance. For many years, he was highly regarded among many sectors of the community as a formidable businessman, trying to better the lives of young African-American men. His group grew beyond the bakery, eventually including a security company, dry cleaning stores, a school and a health and beauty store, becoming the most visible Black Muslim organization in the Bay Area.

Then a year before his death from cancer in 2003, the man who had once been seen as an upstanding role model for young black men was charged with 27 counts in the alleged rapes of four girls under the age of 14. He was awaiting trial on one of those charges when he died.

Through all this, he still had staunch supporters. But critics cited rumors of racism and violence related to Bey, his organization and his ``family'' of young black men.

And since the elder Bey's death, some say the group has been deteriorating into a little more than a street gang suffering from an internal power struggle. Two heirs to Bey's leadership have been killed. The badly decomposed body of Waajid Aliawaad Bey, 51, was found in a shallow grave in the Oakland hills in 2004. He was the CEO of the bakery at the time.

Then Yusuf Bey's son Antar Bey, 23, was shot to death in 2005 in failed carjacking attempt at a gas station on Martin Luther King Jr. Way. And Bey's third successor, Yusuf Bey IV, 23 _ detained in Friday morning's raids _ has had numerous previous contacts with law enforcement. In a pending case, he is accused of leading a 2005 vandalism attack on two liquor stores in West Oakland. According to the charges, eyewitnesses identified Bey and others after viewing a security camera videotape that showed a group of men in black suits and bow ties smashing liquor cases and bottles of booze.

Police were told by store owners and employees that the vandals chastised clerks for selling alcohol to African Americans, which they said is against the tenets of their Muslim faith.

In addition, Bey IV was arrested in 2006 on assault charges in San Francisco after allegedly trying to run down three security guards with his car outside a nightclub. He has also missed several court dates.

Some say there is still good in the Muslim group, but that positive aspects of the elder Bey's legacy might be eclipsed by this current atmosphere of crime and violence.

www.insidebayarea.com/oak...ci_6533089
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Old 08-03-2007, 06:50 PM
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Police raids linked to journalist's slaying


By MICHELLE LOCKE, Associated Press Writer

Friday, August 3, 2007


(08-03) 16:24 PDT Oakland, Calif. (AP) --

Police said they recovered firearms linked to the slaying of an Oakland journalist during a series of early morning raids Friday targeting members of a Black Muslim splinter group that operates a chain of bakeries.

Colleagues said Oakland Post editor Chauncey Bailey, 57, had been working on a story about Your Black Muslim Bakery before he was ambushed and slain Thursday morning near the Alameda County courthouse in downtown Oakland.

Before dawn, officers raided the Muslim group's headquarters at the original bakery on San Pablo Avenue, as well as three houses in Oakland. They arrested seven people on charges including homicide, robbery and assault, including the son of the group's founder, but it was unclear if any of those charges were tied to Bailey's slaying.

"The search warrant yielded several weapons and other evidence of value including evidence linking the murder of Chauncey Bailey to members of the Your Black Muslim Bakery," said Assistant Police Chief Howard Jordan, who said the raids were part of a yearlong investigation into a variety of violent crimes.

Homicide detective Lt. Ersie Joyner said "scientific evidence" had linked the firearms to Bailey's killing.

Joseph Debro, an Oakland businessman who writes a column for the Post, said Bailey had recently asked him for information about Your Black Muslim Bakery's financial troubles for a story Bailey was writing.

"To him it was just another story," Debro said. "He wasn't apprehensive or anxious about it at all. He said he was working on a bunch of stories and this was one."

Your Black Muslim Bakery was founded in 1968 by the late Yusuf Bey as a haven for struggling urban families. It sells natural baked goods alongside books by Malcolm X and other black leaders.

Bailey was a longtime reporter for the Oakland Tribune before becoming editor of the Post, a weekly newspaper geared toward the Bay Area black community, earlier this year.

He had written stories for the Tribune about the bakery and its founder when Bey was facing rape charges in Alameda County. Most of those charges were later dropped, although one was still pending when Bey died in 2003.

Bey's son, Yusuf Bey IV, who was in custody Friday, took over the original bakery and several franchises. In 2005, he was accused by police of being the ringleader in a group of black Muslims who smashed liquor bottles in Oakland corner stores and berated the Muslim owners for selling alcohol to the black community, because alcohol is forbidden by Islam.

Your Black Muslim bakery has been plagued with financial problems for several years, culminating in a bankruptcy filing last October.

In a declaration filed with the bankruptcy court on June 29, Yusuf Bey IV conceded he was "inexperienced in the business world," and had "received advice and consultation from those who had proven to me they did not have my best interests at heart."
___
AP writers Bob Porterfield and Sudhin Thanawala in San Francisco contributed to this report.

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Old 08-04-2007, 11:58 AM
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7 ARRESTED IN RAIDS AFTER EDITOR'S SLAYING

VIOLENT HISTORY: Bakery associates have been accused of crimes, making threats

Jonathan Curiel, Chronicle Staff Writer

Saturday, August 4, 2007


When police raided Your Black Muslim Bakery and three homes, and arrested seven people Friday on suspected involvement in three homicides, including Thursday's slaying of Oakland Post Editor Chauncey Bailey, it was the latest chapter in a history of violence and arrests that have been linked to the longtime Oakland group.

And it wasn't the first time that journalists probing the group have confronted danger. Bailey, who was slain by a masked gunman near his office, had been investigating the organization's finances, according to a Post representative.

In 2002, after the East Bay Express, a weekly paper, published a series of articles documenting a history of violence by bakery members, the series' reporter, Chris Thompson, was threatened and followed, says East Bay Express editor and co-owner Stephen Buel. For his own safety, Thompson worked in a different county for months after the series ran.

"When we first published our stories, we received a bunch of letters to the editor congratulating us on writing a story that had long needed to be written, but we also got a brick through our window and had a number of folks start shadowing the building and driving around and following some of our employees after they left the building," Buel said Friday, hours after authorities raided Your Black Muslim Bakery as part of an investigation into a series of killings, robberies and assaults.

"The threats indicated that they were from" Your Black Muslim Bakery, Buel said. "We have several threats left on voice mail that we obviously had a record of. One of the threats featured a taped quotation of a speech from Yusuf Bey the elder."

The East Bay Express published some follow-up stories to its 2002 series on Your Black Muslim Bakery, but the threats intimidated the weekly paper to the point that "we stopped writing about the group," Buel said.

Your Black Muslim Bakery - well-known in the Bay Area for its peach pies, carrot cakes and ginger-snap cookies - was founded in 1968 by Yusuf Bey, who was arrested in 2002 and charged with forcing an underage girl to have sex in the mid-1970s. At the time of his death from cancer in 2003, Bey was facing trial in that case and allegations from other women who said Bey had abused them for years when they were girls.

Since Bey's death, his successors at the bakery have been charged with a series of crimes. In 2005, a group of men from Your Black Muslim Bakery, including Yusuf Bey IV, a son of the founder, was arrested on suspicion of vandalizing two Oakland liquor stores and threatening the owners for selling alcohol to African Americans. In 2006, the younger Bey, who by then had become a leader of Your Black Muslim Bakery, was arrested and accused of running over a bouncer with his car in San Francisco.

The bakery is not affiliated with the Nation of Islam, the Chicago-based African American ministry headed by Louis Farrakhan, which has mosques in Oakland. In 2005, the Oakland chapter of the Nation of Islam condemned the liquor-store attacks.

For decades, the bakery has had a reputation for making sumptuous eats whose profits went into an organization that stressed good health, hard work, religious adherence (Yusuf Bey converted to Islam under the guidance of the Nation of Islam) and the rehabilitation of workers from hardscrabble backgrounds.

The elder Bey's arrest in 2002 was the first major public sign of trouble for the bakery and its reputation for turning lives around for the better. Since then, allegations have emerged that Bey had a decadeslong history of abusing girls and women, and fathering children with them, and that Bey's cohorts used violence to intimidate detractors and anyone deemed a threat or a nuisance.

Among the alleged incidents on which Thompson reported was one in 1994 in which Nedir Bey, an adopted son of Yusuf Bey, badly beat a man with his fists and feet, apparently because Nedir Bey was unhappy with the man's involvement in a real estate transaction. Nedir Bey broke the man's wrist with a flashlight, and stomped on his groin. Another person in Bey's gang heated a knife and burned the victim's fingers and wrists, Thompson reported. The alleged victim, Olasunkanmi Onipede, escaped only when police happened to show up and Onipede ran to them, according to Thompson's account.

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Remembering Chauncey Bailey

Article Last Updated: 08/03/2007 06:55:42 AM PDT


Tributes, praise, and recollections poured in from around the region Thursday at the death of journalist Chauncey Bailey:

-"I was always impressed that he always cared about the people — the 'little people' as we sometimes say. He truly was a champion for African Americans, not just in Oakland, but all over"

— Bob Butler, KCBS reporter and president of the Bay Area Black Journalists Association

-"Chauncey will be missed. He was at every media event and he always asked the first question. His questions were thoughtful and you knew that he sought to truly inform the public."

— Oakland Mayor Ron Dellums

-"I used to get annoyed at Chauncey. But I learned to appreciate him over the years. He just stayed with it."

— Pamela Drake, aide to former Oakland City Councilman Nate Miley

-"The image that sticks in my mind, of Chauncey, is of him at the gym, in the shorts and the headband and the shirt tucked in, pumping out long-range jumpers, going, 'Stackhouse!'"

— Rory Laverty, former Oakland Tribune columnist

-"Chauncey was somebody who cared about the African American community getting news that he felt was not being reported in the major news media outlets. And he did an incredible job at that."

— Oakland City Councilmember Larry Reid

-"He didn't know me from nobody. He was just very excited. ... He said, 'I'm going to get your name out there, because it's very rare to get a young African

American woman to start a business.'"
— Chakay McDonald, owner of Louisiana Fried Chicken

-"Our community has really suffered a loss. ... He was the voice for a lot of us, because he gave us access to the media that we didn't have."

— George Holland, Oakland branch president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

-"Chauncey contributed so much to the fabric our community. ... It is my hope that the perpetrators of this horrible crime are brought to justice swiftly, and that Chauncey's untimely death will bring our community together and strengthen our collective hand in rooting out this type of violence."

— Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland

-"The very streets that he fought for and wrote about — that his blood should be spilled on those streets today is devastating. ... He was always on top of everything. He was our link. He was at City Hall fighting for us."

— Luenell, actress and costar of "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" who worked with Bailey on Soul Beat Television

-"He has opened up the (St. Kitts) Music Festival to the patrons in the West Coast. He was a pioneer. None of the other major media people ever took advantage of the offers to come to our festival."

— Robert Kelly, director USA Saint Kitts Tourism Authority of the Caribbean island nation Saint Kitts and Nevis

-"This is not just a local loss, this is a loss to the field nationally. His work over the years has probably been responsible for an innumerable set of people being involved in the industry. I know he has been an inspiration to a lot of people."

— David Glover, executive director of OCCUR — the Oakland Citizens Committee for Urban Renewal

-"I'm shocked and saddened at the senseless act that took the life of this dedicated father and sensitive human being. My heartfelt condolences go out to the family of Mr. Bailey and I share the tremendous loss that the community feels for his outstanding journalism and committed civic leadership."

— Assemblyman Sandre Swanson, D-Oakland

-"In many ways, Chauncey typified the challenges and struggles of many African American men. A smart, talented man who chafed at the routine indignities of a white establishment, in this case the media. A loving father denied close contact with his son. And ultimately, unbelievably, a homicide victim, gunned down on the streets of Oakland."

— Brenda Payton, Oakland Tribune columnist

-"We're grief-stricken by his death. ... I want to urge people in the community to use this as an opportunity to do something about the violence in the community. We've go to change this so people can walk safely down the street."

— C. Diane Howell, publisher of the Black Business Listings and producer of Black Expo 2007


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